Business Cases

The Soil Health Partnership's business cases share farmers' experiences and insights from their individual research trials. 

Check back as we continue to add business cases to this page.

Benefits of Cover Crops
Mike Buis, Indiana

soil health business case, wheat and cover crops

Mike Buis began working with the Soil Health Partnership in 2016 to experiment with cover crops. Mike farms 3100 acres of rolling farmland just west of Indianapolis. Most of Mike’s cropland is in a corn-soybean or corn-soybean-wheat rotation. On his SHP research field, he trials a cereal rye cover crop before soybeans, and an oats and radish mix before corn. Experimenting with cover crops on his SHP research field prompted Mike to integrate a wheat cover crop on 300 additional acres. 

This business case focuses on the economic benefits of his wheat cover crop management practices because he has adopted the wheat cover crop at scale.


Business Case: Nutrient Management and Soil Health
Immobile Macronutrients - Phosphorus and Potassium

Immobile Macronutrients - Phosphorus and Potassium

The business case was created in partnership with The Fertilizer Institute.

Potassium helps strengthen the plant’s abilities to resist disease and plays an important role in increasing crop yields and overall quality, including strengthening the plant’s root system. Phosphorus is linked to a plant's ability to use and store energy, overall being necessary for growth and normal development. Phosphorus and potassium nutrients are typically lost through surface water washing away the fertilizer source or erosion. 

This business case highlights two U.S. farmers who incorporate 4R practices into their soil health management system to keep the phosphorus and potassium they apply in the soil.


Business Case: Nutrient Management and Soil Health
Mobile Macronutrients - Nitrogen

Nitrogen-soil-health-pratices

The business case was created in partnership with The Fertilizer Institute.

Nitrogen fertilizer is commonly applied to row crops, such as corn, to improve yield and quality of the harvested crop. However, nitrogen that is not used by a crop or leaves the field can be released into the air, as ammonia and nitrous oxide, and surface and groundwater, as nitrate.

This business case highlights two U.S. farmers who incorporate 4R practices into their soil health management system to optimize nitrogen use.